Google has deleted several dozen apps — many of them aimed at kids — after a security firm found that they contain malware that could show pornographic pop-up ads.

The 60 games, with names such as “Drawing Lessons Lego Ninjago” and “Subway Banana Run Surf,” were downloaded 3 million to 7 million times, Google Play data shows. The apps contained code dubbed “AdultSwine,” Check Point Research said Friday.

After Check Point informed Google about the malware, the tech giant worked with the security firm and deleted the apps right away, Check Point said. Google will continue to show warnings to users who still have the apps installed, according to Check Point.

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Besides displaying porn ads, the malware could also try to trick users into installing fake security apps or to register for premium services.

Also, “the malicious code can use its infrastructure to broaden its goals to other purposes, such as credential theft,” Check Point said.

The security firm warned that the threat isn’t over just because Google has deleted the apps and is warning people about them.

Due to the pervasive use of mobile apps, ‘AdultSwine’ and other similar malware will likely be continually repeated and imitated by hackers,” Check Point said. “Users should be extra vigilant when installing apps, particularly those intended for use by children.”

For a list of the affected apps, see Check Point’s site.

Photo illustration from Thinkstock

Tags: apps, children, Google, kids, malware, porn

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